The UN Human Rights Council calls for an “immediate return” to the civilian government in Sudan

The UN Human Rights Council calls for an “immediate return” to the civilian government in Sudan
The UN Human Rights Council calls for an “immediate return” to the civilian government in Sudan

As mediation between civilians and the military continues to get the country out of the crisis, the United Nations Human Rights Council on Friday called for an “immediate return” to the civilian government in Sudan after the army seized power on October 25. Meanwhile, the French Foreign Ministry said that the military coup in Sudan “threatens” the Paris Club mechanism that allows rich countries to write off what they owe to this African country.

International pressure continues on the ruling military council in Sudan to resume the path of democratic transition. The latest of these pressures came from the UN Human Rights Council, which called on Friday for an “immediate return” to the civilian government in Sudan after the October 25 coup, while the foreign minister in the dismissed government demanded that a “crime” be referred. coup on the International Criminal Court.

The Council adopted a resolution in which it also condemned the “unjust detention” of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, as well as other officials, and demanded that the military “immediately” release “all individuals detained illegally or arbitrarily.”

For its part, the French Foreign Ministry said Friday that the military coup in Sudan “threatens” the Paris Club mechanism that allows rich countries to write off what they owe to this African country.

The ministry said in a statement that an agreement “was reached on July 15” within the framework of the Paris Club, “according to which every creditor must sign a bilateral agreement with Sudan.” “It is clear that the military coup on October 25 threatens this mechanism,” she added, five months after Paris decided to cancel about five billion dollars of debt owed by Sudan.

Several countries repeated what was announced by the British ambassador in Geneva, Simon Manley, who condemned the “dramatic deterioration of the human rights situation” since the coup.

“While the Sudanese people are peacefully rising up against the coup that is trying to break the democratic transition, the international community sends them a strong message of support and pledges, through the unanimous adoption of this resolution, to ensure the return of the rule of law and the restoration of the transitional government to power and respect for human rights,” said the French ambassador in Geneva, Jerome Bonaphon.

Invitation to withdraw

The United Nations’ highest body in the field of human rights held an emergency session at the request of Britain, Germany, the United States and Norway, and the council also requested the appointment of a high-level expert by the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, tasked with monitoring respect for human rights in this country.

Bachelet called on the military to “withdraw to allow the country to find a path forward towards institutional and legal reforms.”

She also condemned a series of human rights violations, such as the shooting of demonstrators, which she said led to the deaths of 13 of them and the wounding of more than 300, and the internet has been cut off since the coup, which prevents residents from accessing information. “All those arbitrarily detained must be released in order to establish a dialogue and return to civilian rule,” she added.

It seems that the situation on the ground is developing rapidly, as the Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Armed Forces, General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, issued a decision Thursday to release four ministers who were detained following the military coup last month, at a time when international pressure is mounting to resume the democratic transition.

In Khartoum, mediation between civilians and the military continues to get the country out of the crisis in which it has been living since Lieutenant-General Al-Burhan announced the coup against his civilian partners, with whom he was sharing power under a political agreement concluded after the overthrow of Al-Bashir in 2019 regarding the management of the country during a transitional phase, after which power will be handed over to a civilian government. Elected by 2023.

للمزيد – Sudan: Are the situation heading towards detente after the military coup?

International Criminal

However, Maryam Al-Sadiq Al-Mahdi, Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Sudanese government, who was dismissed by Al-Burhan, demanded, in a written speech addressed to the Human Rights Council, “considering the military coup among the crimes that fall within the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (..) a matter that needs to be activated in a practical way.”

Although the session held in Geneva did not broadcast the Sudanese minister’s speech, the page of the Sudanese Ministry of Culture and Information on the Facebook site, which rejects the coup, published it.

Al-Mahdi was one of the Sudanese officials in the file of handing over ousted President Omar al-Bashir to the International Criminal Court.

Russia, for its part, expressed its “concern over the deterioration of the situation” in Sudan, considering it “important to avoid any escalation,” but the Moscow delegate stressed that the special session was an “unacceptable interference” in the internal affairs of a country and “premature.” China and Venezuela shared this view, and, like Russia, decided to publicly distance themselves from the consensus.

Contrary to tradition, the deputy permanent representative in Geneva, Othman Abu Fatima Adam Mohamed, called in a letter this week to become Sudan’s spokesman, but the permanent representative, Ali bin Abi Talib, Abdel Rahman Mahmoud, remains the official representative of Sudan in the organization.

FRANCE 24/AFP

 
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