Sudan: Military forces arrest the prime minister and most of the ministers | DW Arabic news | Breaking news and perspectives from around the world | DW

Sudan: Military forces arrest the prime minister and most of the ministers | DW Arabic news | Breaking news and perspectives from around the world | DW
Sudan: Military forces arrest the prime minister and most of the ministers | DW Arabic news | Breaking news and perspectives from around the world | DW

The Sudanese Ministry of Culture and Information announced that “military forces” arrested today (Monday, October 25, 2021) “most of the cabinet members and civilians from the Sovereignty Council”, in the first official statement issued by the government headed by Abdullah Hamdok, after the arrests that took place. dawn.

Later, the ministry said in a statement posted on its Facebook page that “after his refusal to support the coup, a force from the army arrested Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok and transferred him to an unknown location.”

The ministry also confirmed cutting off internet service for mobile phone networks, and closing bridges by military forces.

The director of the Sudanese Prime Minister’s office told Al-Arabiya TV that the “coup” occurred despite reaching an agreement with the head of the military council, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, in the presence of the US special envoy. There were reports that Al-Burhan was going to suspend the constitutional document.

In the early hours of this morning, military forces arrested Muhammad al-Faki, a member of the Sovereignty Council, Khaled Omar, Minister of Cabinet Affairs, Yasser Arman, political advisor to the Prime Minister, Ibrahim al-Sheikh, Minister of Industry, in addition to Faisal Muhammad Salih, an advisor to the Prime Minister’s media. A member of the Empowerment Removal Committee, Wajdi Saleh, the head of the Sudanese Congress Party, Omar Deqir, Urwa, Muhammad Naji Al-Asam, a leader in the Professionals Association, Al-Sadiq Urwa, a leader of the Umma Party, Jaafar Hassan, the official spokesman for Freedom and Change, and Al-Rih Al-Sanhouri, a leader in Freedom and Change, were also arrested.

There was no comment from the Sudanese army until the moment of this news was edited.

The Sudanese Professionals Association, one of the main drivers of the uprising that toppled Omar al-Bashir in 2019, hastened to describe the arrests as a “coup” and, along with other political parties, called for protests and civil disobedience in the country. occupation, blocking all roads with barricades, general strike, non-cooperation with the putschists, and civil disobedience in confronting them.”

The secretariat of the Central Committee of the Sudanese Communist Party issued an appeal urging citizens to take to the streets and said that what took place on Monday morning was a “complete military coup” led by Mr. Al-Burhan and his group. For weeks, the country has been experiencing a severe political crisis between the forces of freedom and change and the military component of the Sovereignty Council, which shares power.

Immediately, dozens of civilians took to the streets of Khartoum, tires were burned, and the Rapid Support Forces were deployed in the streets of the capital.

Demonstrators took to the streets in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, following the military moves this morning

Sudan has been in a state of tension since a failed coup attempt last month gave way to a sharp exchange of accusations between the military and civilian parties, who are supposed to share power after the overthrow of former President Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

In August 2019, the military and civilians (the Coalition of Forces for Freedom and Change), who were leading the protest movement, signed a power-sharing agreement that provided for a three-year transitional period that was later extended. Under the agreement, an executive authority was formed from both parties, provided that power would be handed over to a civilian authority following free elections at the end of the transitional period.. There was a coup attempt in September that was aborted, but officials said that there was a major crisis at the level of power.. As a result, the divisions within the authority, especially between the military and civilians, emerged into the open.

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HZ/AGM (AFP/DPA/Reuters)

 
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