A lesser-known sign of cancer spreading?!

A lesser-known sign of cancer spreading?!
A lesser-known sign of cancer spreading?!

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but researchers have yet to find a cure. Dr. Hussain Abdo, Clinical Director and Pharmacist Supervisor of “Medicine Direct”, explained that one of the lesser known signs in the throat may indicate cancer.

And in 2006, a small Irish study based on a sample of 99 patients with esophageal cancer found that 27% of them reported persistent hiccups.

However, it is still not clear why these patients experienced these attacks.

At the time of the study, lead researcher Thomas Walsh explained that hiccups were a previously unrecognized symptom of esophageal cancer and warranted further investigation.

He noted that persistent hiccups – referring to episodes that typically last longer than 48 hours – were not the most common symptom reported during the study.

The results showed that 68% of the participants reported weight loss and 82% had difficulty swallowing, and lethargy were identified as a common symptom.

Hiccups are caused by a sudden spasm of the diaphragm – the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest. According to Dr. Abdo, “It is a common problem that affects everyone from time to time.

It is usually caused by eating or drinking too quickly, drinking alcohol, or overeating. However, there may be a sign of cancer if your stomach stops working properly and you notice it bloating for no apparent reason.

Hussein Abdo explained that if the tumor compresses the diaphragm, it can lead to spasms. Walsh’s hypothesis repeated this theory in 2006.

He suggested that hiccups in esophageal cancer patients could be related to the phrenic nerve, which controls the diaphragm.

Abdo added, “If a person has persistent hiccups, they should talk to their doctor. If the doctor does not find a clear cause for it, they may refer the patient for tests such as endoscopy, chest X-ray, EKG, or blood tests. During these tests, they can be Cancer discovery.

The survival rate for esophageal cancer is 90% when treated in the first stage after early detection.

Although hiccups may indicate illness, they are a relatively rare symptom.

Cancer Research UK says: “Hiccups are a common problem we all encounter from time to time. But when hiccups are a symptom of cancer or a side effect of cancer treatment, they can last longer.”

 
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