Broken heart syndrome is more common in women and the elderly than in younger adults

Broken heart syndrome is more common in women and the elderly than in younger adults
Broken heart syndrome is more common in women and the elderly than in younger adults

Cardiomyopathy, also known as “broken heart” syndrome, is often caused by stress or the loss of a loved one, and the condition can lead to long-term injury to the heart and impaired heart function.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) according to the site thehealthsiteBroken heart syndrome is now more common, especially among middle-aged, and older women who are diagnosed with the condition up to 10 times more often than younger adults.

The finding confirms the health of the heart-brain circuits, especially for women, said Susan Cheng, senior study author, director of the Research Institute for Healthy Aging in the division of cardiology at the Smedt Heart Institute.

The study suggested that the Corona epidemic posed many challenges and pressures on women, but the incidence of broken heart syndrome was rising before the outbreak of the Corona virus.

Women are more likely to have broken heart syndrome

It is already known that women are more likely to have broken heart syndrome than men, and the new study is the first to reveal gender differences based on age.

The research team examined data on more than 135,000 women and men diagnosed with “broken heart” cardiomyopathy between 2006 and 2017, and found that women are diagnosed more frequently than men, and that women between the ages of 50 and 74 are diagnosed more frequently. At least six to 10 times that, compared to any other demographic.

The annual incidence of broken heart syndrome has increased steadily in both sexes, with women contributing more than 83%, mostly over the age of 50. There was a significant increase in the incidence among middle-aged and older women, compared to younger women.

Christine Albert, chief of cardiology at the Smedt Heart Institute, notes that this study further helps confirm that women in a certain age group are disproportionately at risk of developing stress cardiomyopathy, and that the risk is increasing.

She explained that the higher rates of broken heart syndrome may be due to changes that help the injury or the environment or both, but she stressed the need for more work to know the factors behind the diseases in the case of broken heart and other conditions that are dominated by women.

Cheng and her team are also studying the long-term implications of diagnosing broken heart syndrome, molecular markers of risk, and factors that may contribute to the high incidence of the condition.

Previous studies have shown that women are more susceptible to stress than men and they experience significantly higher levels of stress than men.

 
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