Archaeological discovery in Gibraltar cave dating back 40,000 years

Archaeological discovery in Gibraltar cave dating back 40,000 years
Archaeological discovery in Gibraltar cave dating back 40,000 years

Archaeologists have discovered a new chamber in the Gorama Caves complex in Gibraltar, which has been isolated from the outside world for at least 40,000 years.

Scientists believe that this discovery will allow more knowledge about the culture of Neanderthals.

According to Russia Today, archaeologists began studying Vanguard Cave, which is part of the Gorama cave complex, in 2012, determining its size and finding out if there were sand-filled passages. Last month they found a breach in the sediment and were able to expand it so that the scientists could crawl along the corridor, allowing them to reach an unknown chamber.

Clive Finlayson, director of the Gibraltar National Institute, said: “It’s a real room. Such a discovery is like the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb (in Egypt). You find yourself in a place where no one has been for 40,000 years. It’s impressive.”

In the cave, scientists found lynx bones, spotted hyena vertebrae and the remains of an eagle.

Elsewhere in this cave, experts found ample evidence that Neanderthals were inhabited in antiquity, including stone tools and the remains of murdered animals.

Scientists hope that continuing excavations in this cave will lead them to find the burial place of Neanderthals.

“We have evidence that Neanderthals lived in this cave, like traces of a hearth,” Finlayson said. “But we haven’t yet found where they buried the bodies of the deceased.”

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